Fishing tip of the week

Fluorocarbon Line
by Mike Gerry

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It was a big topic of discussion this past week with a customer of mine, using braided line, while I was using fluorocarbon. We were throwing the same bait in size and color, yet I was getting more bites. The question was why? He was imitating my retrieve, speed, and action yet there was something different. The only thing that we concluded was the braided line was more visible in the water than the fluorocarbon leading me to detail a few reasons that I believe should be discussed.

The first thought, as stated above, clear fluorocarbon line is about invisible in the water when compared to braid. In today’s fishing environment, where the lakes are crowded, and the fish pressured every day from the substantial number of anglers invisibility makes a significant difference.
This time of year, where about everyone is fishing with reaction baits, I believe that if the fish see the line they will stay away from the bait, as they have become accustomed to the fishing pressure and have learned how to avoid your lures.

Braid has a suitable place in bass fishing, there is no doubt about that, but where to use it, with the crowds of anglers fishing our lakes, must be understood. Where not to use it also needs to be understood. Braid has its uses in bass fishing where strength and power fishing come together. Fishing a frog on top, flipping grass, pulling a deep spinner bait, or using it up to a leader in a Carolina rig, all are beneficial uses for braid; but understanding its weaknesses like visibility issues can be crucial in catching fish.

There are also other comparisons to consider, among them is monofilament line has a lot of stretch where fluorocarbon does not.
Today’s angler needs to consider rod set up when comparing fishing line. Somewhere in your set-up there needs to be give, either in the line or the rod tip. Fishing rods have become more flexible again because fluorocarbon line has no stretch which forces you to use a

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